1. How to Make Pure Clean Water with your Freezer
 

2. Making Pure Water by Managing the Freezing Process
 

3. Making Pure Water by Managing the Melting Process
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Water Purification
     
    How to Make Pure Clean Water with your
    Freezer

    You don't have to buy a machine to make perfectly clean and pure water.  All you need is your freezer and one or two large pots, preferably stainless steel and not aluminium.  The method depends on a knowledge of the chemical composition of pure water and of common impurities, and then utilising the fact that these impurities and pure water freeze and melt in a fixed and manageable order.

    Before freezing water. it is a good idea to heat it to 70 or 80 degrees centigrade.  This process is called a "white boil." At this temperature bubbles begin to appear.  The purpose of the 'white boil" is to evaporate most of the chlorine.

    If you nearly fill a large steel pot of "white boiled" and cooled water and put it in the freezer, after 4 or 5 hours, a thin layer of ice will form around the outside of the water like a shell.  This first ice is formed from hard water and contains radio-nucleates.  Hard water is very dangerous to our health.  It freezes at +3.8 degrees C.

    After a further 8 - 12 hours, about two thirds of the water has frozen.  This part is transparent.  It is pure water and freezes at -1 degrees C. This water is the best for our health.

    The last one third contains all other impurities such as heavy metals, pesticides, nitrates, chemical additives, organic matter and rubbish from the plumbing system.  When this final part freezes it shows as a cloudy white core in the centre of the block of ice.  This is light water and freezes last.

    When you freeze a pot of water, it freezes like this:
     

     
     
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    Making Pure Water by Managing the Freezing Process:

    For this method to be successful, you need to learn from experience how quickly the various stages of freezing take place in your freezer and to remember to intervene at each stage.  However, it doesn't matter if you forget or aren't able to be there at the right time.  You will have another chance as the ice melts.

    1.  Before freezing water. it is a good idea to heat it to 70 or 80 degrees centigrade.  This process is called a "white boil." At this temperature bubbles begin to appear.  The purpose of the 'white boil" is to evaporate most of the chlorine.

    2. Fill (to about 90% capacity) a stainless steel container with the cooled 6 6white boiled" water and place it in your freezer with the lid on.  If the tap has not been used for a while, say overnight, always let the water run for a while before filling the pot.  If you don't, you will probably find that the white ice part, (impure water ) will take up most of the pot after freezing.

    3.  After 4 or 5 hours, remove the pot from the freezer.  If a thin shell of ice has formed, break the top surface of ice and throw it away.  Then temporarily pour all the water into another container while you get rid of the rest of the ice stuck to inside of the pot.  Make sure there is no ice floating in the water.

    4. Return the water to the pot and return the pot to the freezer.

    5. After 8 -12 hours, remove the pot and check.  You can expect to find that most of the water has frozen into perfectly clear ice but that there is still some water un-frozen in the centre of the block.  Break the top surface of the ice in the central part of the block with a knife or suitable clean tool and pour away this impure water from the hole in the centre.

    If what you have left is all clear and transparent, then it is pure.  If some part of the ice in the centre is white or cloudy, you can melt it away by running tap water over it and tipping it out until all that is left is clear.

    6.  Put the pot aside and as the ice melts, pour it into a clean glass bottle or . ar with a lid, and store in the refri erator.
     
     
     
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    Making Pure Water by Managing the Melting Process:

    Either by design from the start, or because you did not intervene at the appropriate stage of the freezing process, you can get the same result by intervening in the melting process.

    1. Carry out steps I and 2 as described above, remembering to let the water run for a while if the tap has not been used for a few hours or overnight.  As an experiment you might try freezing the first water of the morning from the tap to see for yourself how and if the proportion of white ice in the centre of the block changes.

    2. Put the pot into the freezer and leave until the water is completely frozen.

    3. Remove the pot.  Notice how much of the block of ice is taken up by the white central part.

    4. Place the pot in a suitable place to let the ice melt.

    5. It is very important that you tip out the first water to melt.  This hard water contains radio-nucleids.  It is what you don't want to be drinking. Tip this water out when about 4 mms has melted from the outside of the block.

    6. As the clear and transparent bulk of the ice-block melts, bottle it and store in the refrigerator as before.

    7. When the clear ice has melted, throw away the white central core which is the polluted part of the water.

     
     Of course, you can combine both methods of making pure water, using the second as a back-up to catch any stage which you missed during the freezing process.

     Keep the purified water in the refrigerator until it is used.  Alternatively it can be stored as ice in the freezer.  Try to drink and prepare all food only with this water.  You will soon notice the difference in how you feel because this water will help your body to clean itself from waste products.

     If you are very busy and wish to to simplify the process as much as possible, you can skip the "white boil" step.  If you do this the chlorine can still largely be removed by becoming trapped in the hard water part of the ice.  However you should then throw away the first 5 or 6 mms of ice which will include hard water, chlorine and radio nucleates.

    The melting process occurs in the same order as the process of freezing.  The outside part containing the hard water and radio-nucleids will melt first.  The pure water will melt next, and you will be left with the white centre part containing all the undesirable rubbish as a white ice-block.

    Based on this explanation of what happens when water freezes and melts, we can make perfectly pure water either by managing the freezing process, or by managing the melting process, or by using bits of both.
     
     
     
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